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The story of how pride flag maker started

In 1978, San Francisco resident Gilbert Baker created the first pride flag as a symbol of unity and diversity for the LGBTQIA+ community. The original flag featured eight stripes, each representing a different aspect of the community: sexuality, life, healing, sunlight, nature, magic/art, serenity, and spirit.

Since then, the pride flag has become an international symbol of inclusion and acceptance, flown at Pride parades and events around the world. In 2019, Baker’s original flag was inducted into the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., as a “powerful symbol of hope.”

Today, there are many different versions of the pride flag, each with its own meaning and purpose.

Here’s a look at the 10 most popular pride flags and their histories.

The Rainbow Flag:

The most iconic and widely-recognized pride flag maker is the rainbow flag. Designed by Gilbert Baker in 1978, the rainbow flag has become a symbol of diversity and inclusion for the LGBTQIA+ community. The original flag featured eight stripes, each representing a different aspect of the community: sexuality, life, healing, sunlight, nature, magic/art, serenity, and spirit. Today, the flag is flown at Pride parades and events around the world as a sign of solidarity and support for the LGBTQIA+ community.

The Transgender Flag:

The transgender flag was designed by Tran’s woman Monica Helms in 1999. The flag consists of two stripes, one blue and one pink, representing the traditional colors for baby boys and girls. The white stripe in the middle represents those who are transitioning or non-binary. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the transgender community.

The Bisexual Flag:

The bisexual flag was designed by Michael Page in 1998. The flag consists of three stripes, pink for women who love women, blue for men who love men, and purple for those who love both. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the bisexual community.

The Pansexual Flag:

The pansexual flag was designed by Jim Evans in 2010. The flag consists of three stripes, pink for people who identify as female, yellow for people who identify as non-binary, and blue for people who identify as male. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the pansexual community.

The Asexual Flag:

The asexual flag was designed by AVEN user Covell in 2010. The flag consists of four stripes, black for asexuality, grey for grey-asexuality or demisexuality, white for non-asexual partners, and purple for community. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the asexual community.

The Lesbian Flag:

The lesbian flag was designed by Sean Campbell in 2018. The flag consists of six stripes, pink for femininity, red for strength and courage, orange for creativity and passion, yellow for sun and happiness, green for nature and serenity, and blue for harmony and peace. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the lesbian community.

The Non-Binary Flag:

The non-binary flag was designed by Kye Rowan in 2014. The flag consists of seven stripes, yellow for those who identify outside of the gender binary, white for agender or neutral identities, purple for those who feel a mix of genders, black for those who do not identify with any gender, brown for those whose gender is fluid or in flux, pink for femininity, and blue for masculinity. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the non-binary community.

The Genderqueer Flag:

The genderqueer flag was designed by Marilyn Roxie in 2010. The flag consists of three stripes, lavender for androgyny or queerness, white for agender or neutral identities, and green for those whose identities are defined outside of the binary. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the genderqueer community.

The Intersex Flag:

The intersex flag was designed by OII Australia in 2013. The flag consists of a circle of yellow and purple, with a purple arrow pointing up to represent intersex people who are comfortable with their sex assigned at birth, and a yellow arrow pointing down to represent those who are not. The flag is a sign of solidarity and support for the intersex community.

Conclusion:

These are just a few of the many flags that have been designed to represent the LGBTQIA+ community. Each flag is a symbol of solidarity and support for the people who identify with that particular flag. When you see these flags flying at Pride parades or events, know that you are not alone; there is a whole community of people who stand with you and support you.

Alex

Alex is an SEO expert,writer and blogger with a strong passion for writing.

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